Blog - Grand Auctions


The Distinguished Service cross was introduced in 1901 and was initially named the Conspicuous Service Cross before being changed in October 1914. The cross was created to award both warrant and junior naval officers who were not eligible for the Distinguished Service Order (DSO). As well as the award’s name being changed in 1914, the eligibility was extended to include all naval officers below the rank of lieutenant commander.

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  • Posted by Robin Newcombe

The Royal Airforce was formed on 1st April 1918. Shortly after, on 3rd June, the Distinguished Flying Cross was created in order to recognise actively galant and heroic actions against the enemy. The cross was originally only awarded to commissioned and warrant officers as the other ranks were issued with the Distinguished Flying Medal. However, in 1941, the award was extended to those serving in the Fleet Air Arm serving in the RAF and, from February 1942, to the personnel of the Dominions.

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  • Posted by Robin Newcombe

The Defence Medal was issued by the United Kingdom in May 1945 and is the most common of the Second World War series of medals. It was awarded to a large number of civilians of the British Commonwealth who formed part of the recognised defence units such as the Home Guard and Civil Defence and the non-operational military who were subjected to air attack or closely threatened during three years of service running up to the 8th May 1945. The medal was issued unnamed and produced in cupro-nickel with exception to the Canadian issue version which was struck in silver.

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  • Posted by Robin Newcombe

The Victory Medal also known as the Allied Victory Medal was issued as a result of an International agreement reached at the Inter Allied Peace Conference. Although each Allied nation issued their own bronze victory medal, they all bore a similar design with equivalent wording and an identical rainbow coloured ribbon. In this blog we will take a look at the medal and its history in a little more detail.

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  • Posted by Robin Newcombe

Nearly 6.5 million British War Medals were produced in silver with approximately 110,000 produced in bronze. They were produced to commemorate some of the most horrific battles ever known, resulting in a vast number of casualties and deaths. All ranks of both men and women who served with the British and Imperial forces, whether as part of a unit in a theatre of war or those employed in hospitals were awarded with the British War Medal.

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  • Posted by Robin Newcombe

The Mercantile Marine War medal was awarded by the Board of Trade to all Mercantile Marine ranks who had undertaken one or more voyages through either a war zone or a considered danger zone. This included men who served in the coastal trade such as lightship crews, pilots and fishermen. Additionally, it was awarded to all those who had served for more than six months at sea between 4th August 1914 and 11th November 1918.

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  • Posted by Robin Newcombe

There are three variations of these campaign medals which were awarded to both officers and men of the British and Imperial forces who saw service in any theatre of war during World War One between 1914 and 1915. These medals were never awarded singularly and were generally presented to those who were awarded the Victory Medal and the British War Medal.

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  • Posted by Robin Newcombe

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